Category: Resources

Job Opportunity: Community Engagement and Communications Manager

We have a staff position open! We’re looking for a Community Engagement and Communications Manager to join us in our work to preserve and promote Baltimore’s historic places. Below is description of the position and how to apply. The application deadline is June 30, 2019

Pay & Benefits: $50,000 and $1,500 retirement plan match.

Applications Due: June 30, 2019

Start Date: September 3, 2019

Position Description

The Community Engagement and Communications Manager will lead Baltimore Heritage’s tours, educational programs, and outreach initiatives to engage people in our mission of protecting and promoting historic buildings and revitalizing historic neighborhoods in Baltimore City.

The manager is responsible for a range of community programs including planning historic walking and building tours, managing an annual micro-grant program for preservation projects, and working with volunteer contributors to publish stories about historic places to our Explore Baltimore Heritage website and app. The manager will also be responsible for sharing information about these programs and the broader work of the organization through Baltimore Heritage’s website, social media, and print communications.

This is a full time position (40 hours per week) reporting to the executive director. Work hours are typically 9:00 am to 5:00 pm with occasional evening and weekend requirements. The work will take place mostly at Baltimore Heritage’s office as well as locations throughout Baltimore City for meetings and program events.

Position Responsibilities

Education Programs

  • Heritage Tours Programs: Initiate tours at new sites by contacting potential building owners and tour guides, research and write tour descriptions and announcements, support volunteer guides and organizers, attend tours, and compile quarterly reports.
  • Preservation Micro-Grant Program: Promote micro grant program to prospective applicants, manage grant selection process, organize public event where final grants are selected and announced, work with grantees on follow-up stories.
  • Explore Baltimore Heritage Website & App: Draft occasional interpretive stories on historic places in the Baltimore area and edit and publish stories from volunteer contributors.
  • Bmore Historic unconference: Help coordinate a volunteer planning committee to organize an annual unconference at the Baltimore Museum of Industry.

Communications

  • Website: Periodically update Baltimore Heritage WordPress-based website.
  • Social Media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook Groups): Use social media to promote public programs and share announcements and information related to Baltimore Heritage and preservation in Baltimore. Social media responsibilities include moderating two Facebook groups—the Old House Forum for local historic homeowners and Bmore Historic for area preservationists and historians.

Administrative

  • Assist in organizing and staffing annual historic preservation awards event, annual membership renewal mailing, monthly board of directors meetings, and other fundraising and program efforts.
  • Assist in maintaining and updating member records.

Qualification and Skill Requirements

  • Interest in Baltimore and the city’s history, architecture, and people
  • Bachelor’s degree in historic preservation, history, urban planning, or a related field
  • Strong writing and research skills
  • Experience researching local history or preparing National Register nominations
  • Ability to work with volunteers and community partners
  • Ability to work independently with good organization and time management skills
  • Familiarity with WordPress, GSuite (Docs, Slides, Sheets), Adobe Photoshop and/or Adobe InDesign, and membership management tools (e.g. Salesforce, CiviCRM)

To Apply

Send cover letter, resume, and short (500 words or less) writing sample to Mr. Johns W. Hopkins, Executive Director, Baltimore Heritage: hopkins@baltimoreheritage.org.

For questions, contact Mr. Hopkins at 410-332-9992 or hopkins@baltimoreheritage.org.

About Baltimore Heritage

Baltimore Heritage is a city-wide non-profit historic preservation organization. Founded in 1960, it has two-full time staff positions, a 35 member board of directors, and dozens of volunteers. Baltimore Heritage operates in three primary areas: preservation advocacy for historic buildings and neighborhoods; education programs including an expansive Heritage Tours Program; and technical assistance to homeowners and building owners working to restore their historic buildings.

This Saturday! Meet Baltimore’s historic homeowners and learn new ways to help your house

This Saturday, we are partnering with Retrofit Baltimore and Live Baltimore to host our very first historic homeowner social. Stop by Second Chance anytime from 10:00 am to 11:30 am to enjoy coffee, donuts, and answers to all your questions about weatherization, historic tax credits, and home buying in Baltimore City.

This event is also your first chance to sign up for the 2015 Baltimore Historic House Co-op. The co-op is a way for homeowners to save money on weatherization services through Retrofit Baltimore. For each home-owner who signs up before April 25 and pledges to complete their project by the fall, Retrofit’s contractors are offering a 1% discount – up to a 15% discount for everyone who participates. Learn more about the benefits of weatherization for historic properties or sign up for the Historic House Co-op today.

This new partnership is just one of many new resources that we’ve put together for historic home-owners over the past few months. Check out new or recently updated resources including:

We even have a new resource guide just for homeowners – a growing online toolkit  for the thousands of home-owners who preserve historic neighborhoods. If you have questions or suggestions for how we can help historic homeowners in Baltimore, please get in touch. And don’t forget to join us at Second Chance on Saturday morning!

Registration now open for Bmore Historic unconference and a game jam with THATCamp Games

Do you work at a museum or library? Volunteer for your neighborhood design review committee or preservation commission? Teach history at a local public school or college? Then we invite you to join us for Bmore Historic unconference at the Maryland Historical Society on Friday, October 10!

Bmore Historic is a unique opportunity to connect with students, scholars and professionals in public history and historic preservation for discussions, workshops and creative presentations on the issues that you care about.

How do we know you will like Bmore Historic? Because you set the agenda! Bmore Historic is an unconference where participants work together to propose the topics, set the schedule and facilitate the sessions throughout the day. An unconference is an alternative to a typical professional or academic conference where the schedule is set months in advance. Participants share session ideas online before the event and the schedule isn’t set until morning of October 10. Session leaders are encouraged to facilitate a conversation, not deliver a PowerPoint presentation! Registration is only $10 for students and $15 for professionals including breakfast and lunch.

Bmore Historic is also a great opportunity to build skills thanks to volunteer-led workshops running throughout the day. We are currently planning  workshops on topics including managing digital archives and new approaches to engaged scholarship. Please let us know if there is a topic, skill or tool you want to see included.

This year, we’re especially excited to share a fun program for anyone interested in exploring the intersections of history, education, and games: the Bmore Historic Game Jam. The game jam will be a lively and experimental dive into the potential of games to bring history to life in new ways organized in partnership with THATCamp Games – an unconference on humanities, technology, games, and learning taking place at the Baltimore Harbor Hotel on October 11-12.

View of the Battle Monument, John Rubens Smith (1775-1849), 1828. Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-DIG-ds-01545.

Learn more about Bmore Historic 2014 or get in touch with questions or suggestions. Registration for Bmore Historic and THATCamp Games is now open so sign up soon!

Baltimore’s Old House Stories: Missing Baseboards and a Bolton Hill Brownstone

Thanks to Margaret De Arcangelis, Education & Outreach Director with Preservation Maryland for sharing the story of her historic Bolton Hill rowhouse and the adventure of starting an exciting restoration project.

Margaret's Old House

I came across a tweet the other day and could not help but smile: “It’s funny what makes you happy as a home owner.  I have baseboards.  Yeah!!! J”

As someone who has always enjoyed visiting old houses and loves learning about architecture, I always thought baseboards were great. It was not until this summer, however, when my husband and I bought our first house, that I truly appreciated the value of a well-placed baseboard. This appreciation is largely due to the fact that some of our baseboards, plaster, banisters and light fixtures are missing and I can only dream of the day when they will all be back in place.

Christopher and I did not buy a move-in ready starter house like many people do.  Instead Chris has lovingly followed me into what may be my most hare-brained (but wonderful!) idea yet.  We bought a true fixer-upper – an 1886 brownstone in Bolton Hill that needs more repair work than I have  space to list in this short post.  Like so many of the houses in that neighborhood, a prior owner subdivided the house into apartments leaving vestiges of long abandoned kitchens and bathrooms on each floor. Numerous walls were damaged when temporary walls were built and later torn down. Unlike many others rowhouses in Bolton Hill, however, our house remained in the hands of just one family from the 1880s to the 1950s (thank you MD Land Records for providing that fun fact!) and much of the original detail remains intact down to the stylish patterned parquet floors. Much of wood work including our 45 wood windows is covered by only one or two coats of paint and, despite a few missing pieces, the original stained glass transoms are in place and can be repaired.

After searching for the right house for ten months, I knew this was the perfect house for us the first time I saw it. There are so many beautiful details throughout the house that would be impossible or at least cost prohibitive for us to have in any other house. Some days the house does present challenges. The first few times it rained we found a new leak each time. We discovered that the duct tape on one of the sewer lines in the basement was not covering up a small crack in the pipe, but instead was put there to cover the ten inch by two-inch gouge in the pipe. We learned that sometimes the scope of a project changes midway through due to unforeseen circumstances, which may mean you need to remove a 100-year-old piece of Lincrusta from the wall so the plumbers can run new water lines. No matter what the new issue is with our house, all of those feelings of frustration go away each time I go to unlock the front door and am reminded how lucky I am to own such a beautiful old house.

We’re looking for more “old house stories” along with resources, tips and tricks you can share with other old house owners in Baltimore. Join the conversation on Facebook with Baltimore’s New Old House Forum or get in touch with Eli Pousson at pousson@baltimoreheritage.org

Resource: Illustrated Guidelines on Sustainability for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings

Sustainability is a critical issue in architecture, design and planning and while we believe “the greenest building is built” we support the many home-owners and property owners who are seeking new ways to improve the efficiency and sustainability of their historic homes, apartment buildings, factories, and Main Street properties.

Thanks to the Technical Preservation Services with the National Park Service we now have an accessible and easy-to-use guide that can help historic property owners make important decisions about everything from weatherization to wind-power. The Illustrated Guidelines on Sustainability for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings offer practical guidelines with dos and don’ts on how to retrofit your home or business for sustainability. Projects that can follow these guidelines may also be eligible for state or federal historic tax credits.

Site Features—Sustainability Guidelines—Technical Preservation Services, National Park Service

You can find the Illustrated Guidelines on Sustainability for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings online or download a PDF copy of the 2011 printed version of the guidelines. If you are interested in learning more about combining historic preservation and weatherization, please join us later this month for our latest introductory workshop with Retrofit Baltimore on May 29.