Author: Molly Ricks

2021 Virtual Pitch Party: Help Us Give Away Five Micro-Grants!

Please help us give away six micro-grants to advance good ideas in Baltimore. This is our sixth year of providing micro-grants and as we have done in past years, we’ll have five finalists provide three-minute “pitches” of their ideas… and then we will ask you to cast virtual ballots for your favorite. Based on your votes, we will give out two $500 grants, two $250 grants, and two $50 grants. Register here!

This year hear pitches from these organizations:

  • Baltimore Crime Museum
  • Baltimore Immigration Memorial and Museum, Inc.
  • Cooperative Community Development Inc
  • Irish Railroad Workers Museum
  • Friends of St. Vincent Cemetery (FoSVC)
  • Thomas Johnson Elementary Middle School #84

We’ll learn about some great initiatives underway in Baltimore and have a little fun helping them out. This is also Baltimore Heritage’s annual meeting where we elect board members and officers. It’s free and we hope you join us!

Thank you again for supporting us and our work with Baltimore’s historic buildings and neighborhoods. Whether from your couch or your backyard, we hope you can join us at 5:30 pm on October 21, 2021 via Zoom for this special event.

2021 Fall Lecture: Mapping Baltimore Apartheid (Virtual Talk!)

Our 2021 Fall Lecture is virtual this year! On Friday, join us and the Baltimore Architecture Foundation to kick off Doors Open Baltimore with Dr. Lawrence Brown, author of The Black Butterfly: The Harmful Politics of Race and Space in America! Register here!

Dr. Brown will put Baltimore under a microscope, looking at the causes of segregation and drawing on extensive research of data and policy. Brown will demonstrate how data visualization can be a tool to distribute resources to communities in need, and speak to the roles of design, planning, and preservation in healing and restoring redlined Black neighborhoods.

Dr. Brown’s presentation will be followed by a discussion and Q&A moderated by author and journalist Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson.

Participating discussants include:

Seema Iyer, Ph.D, Associate Director of the Jacob France Institute, University of Baltimore

Tom Liebel, FAIA, Vice-President of Moseley Architects and CHAP Commission Chair

Nakita Reed, AIA, Associate, Quinn Evans Architects

A limited number of signed copies of The Black Butterfly: The Harmful Politics of Race and Space in America are available through the Baltimore Architecture Foundation bookstore at the Baltimore Center for Architecture and Design. Books can be purchased using one of the Eventbrite ticket options, either “Delivery” or Pick Up.” Further details on getting your book will be included in the confirmation email. Questions? Reach out to Nathan Dennies at ndennies@aiabalt.com.

Doors Open Baltimore 2021 includes a month’s worth of virtual and in-person programming. Visit www.doorsopenbaltimore.org for more information. We are pleased to be sponsoring this event in partnership with the Baltimore Architecture Foundation, which is handling registration.

 

About this event

This program is hosted on Zoom and Facebook Live. Upon registering you will receive an email confirmation and a Zoom link. If you do not receive a link, please contact ndennies@aiabalt.com. If you do not contact us at least 1 hour prior to the start of the program, we cannot guarantee admittance.

Tickets are donation based. We encourage you to give what you can to support BAF and Baltimore Heritage. Your support helps us make up for lost tour and program revenue from COVID-19 and create more virtual programs like this.

This talk is part of Free Fall Baltimore which is presented by BGE, and is a program of the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, an independent non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

Mount Vernon Place Interiors Art Show and Online Auction

Thank you to all who participated in this year’s art show activities! The Best in Show Award goes to Michael Kotarba, for his painting Currently on View and congratulations to Tom Ritchie for winning this year’s People’s Choice Award for his piece Check-In. (see both paintings below!). We hope to see you again next year!


Baltimore’s Mount Vernon Place is famous for the beauty of its exterior architecture. This fall, we invite you to virtually view—and bid on—some of its stateliest indoor spaces at the Mount Vernon Place Interiors Art Show. This mostly online event—an offshoot of the popular 2019 Mount Vernon Place Plein Air Art Show—will feature paintings by 12 artists. Their subjects will include the interiors of the Peabody Institute, the Walters Art Museum, Hotel Revival, and the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion. Scroll down to see the art! 

1) Online Auction – now live!

Bidding begins at 5pm on Friday, September 24th. Proceeds and donations will benefit Baltimore Heritage, the Garrett-Jacobs Endowment Fund, the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy, and most importantly, the artists.

2) Virtual Auction Opening Event – Friday Sept. 24, 5-6 pm

The Engineers Club of Baltimore will be hosting a virtual reception on Friday, September 24 at 5pm. Guests are invited to join the event for an opportunity to meet and talk with the artists and other guests, and preview the items up for auction. Please note, the site will not be accessible until the event begins.

3) In-Person Artwork Viewing Day – Sunday Oct. 3, 11 am to 3 pm

The artwork will be on display at the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion on Sunday, October 3rd, from 11am-3pm. Bidders are invited to see the artwork in person by registering for a 20-minute session HERE. Awards for Best in Show and Viewer’s Choice will be announced on social media at 3pm, and the auction will close at 8pm.

Check out the Facebook page for updates! Or you can email heritage@esb.org, and we’ll notify you when bidding begins. Baltimore Heritage is pleased to co-host this event with the Garrett-Jacobs Endowment Fund, the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy, and the Engineers Club.

Watch Over Us
by Lissa Abrams
oil on board, 16×20

 

The Evening Staircase
by Bruno Baran
oil on canvas, 18×24

 

Peabody Steps
by Ann Crostic
oil on linen panel, 20×16

 

Staircase
by Laurie DeMatteo
oil on canvas, 10×16

 

Art and Wonder
by Janice Kirsh
oil on linen, 20×16

 

Lights and Mirrors
by Kathleen Kotarba
oil on linen panel, 16×20

 

Currently on View (2021 Winner, “Best in Show”)
by Michael Kotarba
watercolor, 22×17

 

 

Grand Entrance, Walters Art Museum
by Lisa Mitchell
pastel, 20×16

 

Meditating in the Walters
by Crystal Moll
oil on canvas, 12×28

 

Check-In (2021 Winner, “People’s Choice Award”)
by Tom Ritchie
oil on linen, 16×20

 

Walters Museum Interior
by David Wiesand
acrylic on canvas, 16×20

 

A.M. Meditation
by Karen Winston-Levin
oil, 20×24

Accepting Ideas for 2021 Micro Grants for Preservation Work

We’re in our 6th year of giving away micro-grants to help fund preservation work in the city. If you have a good idea to help preserve a historic building or place in Baltimore or help revitalize a historic neighborhood, we’d love to hear from you! The process is easy: simply fill out the online application and hit send by Wednesday, September 22, 2021.

We’ll pick the five most promising ideas and give them a chance for one of two $500 grants, two $250 grants, or one $50 grant. The awards will be made on October 21, 2021 at a virtual pitch party. Over Zoom, supporters of each idea will get three minutes to pitch them and at the end, the crowd will cast virtual ballots to decide which ideas receive the micro grants. Whether funded or not, we will promote all the ideas and projects to help them garner attention and volunteers.

The types of eligible projects are endless, and as long as they relate to Baltimore’s history, heritage, historic buildings or historic neighborhoods we will consider them. Past award winners include: restoring leaking masonry at a historic church, launching an after school arts-based safe space program in a historic neighborhood, supporting archaeological efforts at a historic furnace, and providing supplies for a community trying to provide access to a neighboring park. The sky’s the limit!

The amount of the award ($50, $250, or $500) may not be enough to complete an entire project. That’s OK. The goal is to help spark new and support existing neighborhood-level preservation work. You don’t need to be a nonprofit organization or even a formalized group to be eligible. Individuals and small groups are welcome! Complete rules can be found on the application.

And you can now register for October 21’s Virtual Preservation Pitch Party!

Remembering Julian “Jack” Lapides

Today, July 14, long-time Baltimore Heritage board member Julian “Jack” Lapides passed away. His death has saddened us in too many ways to count. And his legacy and impact on Baltimore, Maryland, and indeed the country, is also too expansive to properly capture. Nonetheless, we would humbly like to offer a tribute to Jack for his dedication to making our lives, our neighborhoods, and the world a better place by sharing a few highlights of his life’s work in his own words. Below are audio excerpts from an oral interview that fellow board members Susan Talbott and Barbara Weeks conducted with him several years ago. We hope you appreciate these short recordings for what they are: Jack sharing stories of fighting to save our heritage, fighting for civil rights, fighting always for the right path forward even against overwhelming odds, and always told with a smile and a joke in a way that only Jack could do.


Facing Urban Renewal & the Highway Fight

Beginning in the 1960s, Jack was one of the very first people to oppose a highway that would have paved over Fell’s Point and Federal Hill in East Baltimore and through Poppleton and Harlem Park in West Baltimore. He was instrumental in saving Baltimore’s waterfront and although part of the highway was built in West Baltimore, he helped block it half-way through construction and prevented even greater destruction in West Baltimore.

Saving Stirling Street (Plus Jack’s Favorite Preservation Story)

With his wife Linda, Jack convinced city officials not only to save historic Stirling Street in the Oldtown neighborhood, but to sell the houses for $1 to new owners, thus launching Baltimore’s famous Dollar House Program. 

Preserving the Phipps Building On Hopkins’ Campus

While in the Maryland Senate, Jack threatened to withhold funds that Johns Hopkins Hospital sought for a new oncology center until they agreed to save the historic Phipps building. The result: a saved and restored Phipps building and a new oncology center (with state funds) built nearby.

Passing the Public Accommodations Bill, 1963

In his first year in the state legislature, Jack supported legislation that would make it illegal for owners of places like restaurants and theaters to bar African Americans entry. Jack had won his seat by beating out an incumbent who opposed this civil rights legislation, and was one of two new votes that swung the state legislature into passing the Public Accommodations law of 1963. 

Starting the Maryland State Arts Council

Recognizing the importance of the arts in creating vibrant communities, Jack was one of the founding members of the Maryland State Arts Council in 1967.