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Baltimore Architecture Foundation

410.625.2585|http://baltimorearchitecture.org/

September 2021

The Underground Railroad in Baltimore County (Virtual Talk)

September 24 @ 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Virtual MD United States
By Donation

In observance of International Underground Railroad Month, historian and write Louis Diggs will tell the story of the journey to freedom through Baltimore County revealing sites in the area that were part of the Underground Railroad.

Louis Diggs is a chronicler of African American history specializing in Baltimore County. His work illuminates the historic past of its Black communities. He is the author of ten books focusing on African American history in the Baltimore region. Diggs was honored by the State of Maryland for his contributions in preserving the history of Maryland's Black communities. Diggs led the effort to restore the Cherry Hill African Union Methodist Protestant Church in Granite, Maryland and convert it to the Diggs/Johnson Mini-Museum on African American History.

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October 2021

Virtual Fall Lecture: Mapping Baltimore Apartheid

October 1 @ 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Virtual MD United States
By Donation

Baltimore Architecture Foundation and Baltimore Heritage kick off Doors Open Baltimore with Dr. Lawrence Brown, author of "The Black Butterfly: The Harmful Politics of Race and Space in America." Dr. Brown will put Baltimore under a microscope, looking at the causes of segregation and drawing on extensive research of data and policy. Brown will demonstrate how data visualization can be a tool to distribute resources to communities in need, and speak to the roles of design, planning, and preservation in healing and restoring redlined Black neighborhoods.

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Sound and Proclamation: Learning about Henry McShane and his Bells (Virtual Talk)

October 8 @ 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Virtual MD United States
By Donation

Join us and Luke McCusker of the Irish Railroad Workers Museum as we explore Henry McShane, his bell foundry and the churches where they were installed. His work was vital in the proclamation of religious freedom throughout America's cities and towns. By McShane’s death, his foundry had 1,000 employees. He and his workers had made and shipped over 200,000 bells, supplying 75% of the bells found in America’s churches. Ships and civic memorials also purchased bells from the firm. McShane is also credited with naming Dundalk, having established a factory there and naming it after Dundalk, Ireland where his father was born.

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Baltimore’s Vernacular Churches (Virtual Talk)

October 15 @ 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Virtual MD United States
By Donation

Along with its famous, architecturally distinguished churches, Baltimore retains many lesser-known but architecturally and socially interesting church buildings. Some are modest, simple structures, some are grander, and probably all of them have been ignored when we think about Baltimore's architectural heritage. If we stop to look at them, however, we see the evidence of Baltimore's spatial and population growth in the years before the Civil War. They tell a tale of geographic and social mobility, changing tastes, and even theological change. You can see all this, if you know what you're looking at.

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Restoring the Hawley-Hutzler House (Virtual Talk)

October 22 @ 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Virtual MD United States
By Donation

In 2019, the grand Victorian 8,000 square foot Hawley-Hutzler Mansion went on the market. The mansion was once the home of the Hutzlers, who owned the famous department store of the same name. The mansion has gone through significant alterations since it was built in 1887, including being converted to offices, and in the 1970s, split up into apartments. Needless to say, there would be a lot of work to do to restore this mansion to its former grandeur.

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A History of Poppleton (Virtual Talk)

October 29 @ 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Virtual MD United States
By Donation

Learn about the history of Poppleton with Professor Nicole King (Department of American Studies, UMBC). King has worked with local residents and preservationists to document the important Black history of Poppleton, which has been threatened by slum clearance, urban renewal, highway construction, and redevelopment. We will also learn about ongoing advocacy efforts to preserve Poppleton's historic places and fight displacement, such as the proposed CHAP local historic district, Black Homeownership in Old Poppleton.

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