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Originally called Laurel Factory, the town of Laurel today started as a 19th century milltown with ties to Baltimore along the B&O railroad line. Situated halfway between Baltimore and DC on the Patuxent River, it started as a small grist mill in 1811 and by 1840 had evolved into a cotton mill employing more than 700 workers. Join us and our guide Ann Bennett, Executive Director of the Laurel Historical Society, as we soak in the natural setting of historic Laurel while learning about its bustling past!


Originally called Laurel Factory, today’s town of Laurel started as a 19th-century milltown with ties to Baltimore along the B&O railroad line. Situated halfway between Baltimore and DC on the Patuxent River, Laurel began as a small grist mill in 1811. In the 1840s, it evolved into a cotton mill employing more than 700 workers. And during the Civil War, Union troops guarded the railroad line in Laurel, the only rail connection between the North and Washington, DC at the time.

Please join us and our tour guide, Ms. Ann Bennett, the Executive Director of the Laurel Historical Society as we walk through Laurel’s main street, see the remains of the mill’s ruins along the Patuxent River, and discuss The Grove, Laurel’s distinctly African American neighborhood that got its start in the mid-19th century amid harsh racism, and later institutionalized segregation, in Prince George’s County.  We will end at the Historical Society’s museum, which is located in one of the original mill workers houses, and take a look at their new exhibit commemorating the 150th anniversary of the town’s incorporation. 
 

When
February 9th, 2020 1:00 PM   through   2:30 PM
Location
817 Main St
Laurel, MD 20707
Tickets
Ticket $15.00