Home » Historic Preservation

Historic preservation advocacy and outreach

We love old buildings and historic neighborhoods. We work with home-owners, neighborhood organizations and property owners across the city to save places that matter through advocacy, technical assistance and community organizing. These places include parks, public buildings, churches and even private homes.

What is historic preservation? Learn more about Baltimore Heritage and how we save historic places in our community. Looking for help with a historic landmark in your neighborhood? Start with our resources.

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Advocacy Issues — Help us save Baltimore’s historic places

We work with residents, property owners and neighborhood advocates to promote historic preservation across the city. We identify at-risk buildings and work proactively with property owners and community residents to preserve a threatened landmark. Learn more about historic preservation advocacy issues in Baltimore.

Preserving Historic Neighborhoods

Greater Hampden Heritage Alliance Meeting

We work closely with the Baltimore Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation and neighborhood activists in Mount Vernon, Bolton Hill, Fell’s Point and other historic districts to promote responsible stewardship and neighborhood revitalization.

Archeology in Baltimore

Civil War Archeology in Lafayette Square

Our new public archeology program is documenting and protecting archeological resources in Lafayette Square and Patterson Park. Learn more.

Awards — Celebrate historic preservation projects and achievements

Our annual Preservation Awards celebrate preservation projects large and small from across the city. Please join us in June for a fantastic celebration!

Ongoing Projects

We Dig Hampstead Hill! Searching for the War of 1812 in Patterson Park

Learn more about our archaeological investigation of Patterson Park this spring.Patterson Park, known as Hampstead Hill in the early 1800s, was the site of Baltimore’s major defensive position against a British land invasion in the War of 1812. With funding from the Maryland Heritage Area Authority and the National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program, Baltimore Heritage is undertaking an archaeological investigation of Patterson Park in spring 2014. Learn more about this project or about archeology in Baltimore.

Documentation and Designation in West Baltimore

We are working to connect historic preservation and community revitalization in historic West Baltimore neighborhoods, focused around the US 40 corridor, proposed for the development of the Red Line light rail route. One of our major initiatives is the documentation and designation of historic landmarks in Midtown Edmondson and Greater Rosemont. Learn more about preservation in West Baltimore or take a look at our digital publications for the Landmarks on the Red Line.

Advocating for Preservation on Downtown’s West Side

From the late 1700s through the 1940s, the West Side grew as a vital center of transportation, commerce, and cultural life. Unfortunately, in the late 20th century retail shopping and investment drifted out to Baltimore’s suburbs, many of these businesses closed, and their buildings began to decay from neglect. Baltimore Heritage and our partners are continuing to advocate for the preservation-based revitalization of this historic downtown Baltimore neighborhood. Learn more about this issue.

Organizing the Friends of West Baltimore Squares

The Friends of West Baltimore Squares is a new initiative started in partnership with the Parks & People Foundation and neighborhood organizations in West and Southwest Baltimore to organize support for Franklin Square, Harlem Park, Lafayette Square, Perkins Square and Union Square, through events, outreach and advocacy. Visit the Friends of West Baltimore Squares or our project page to learn more about this project.

Building Support for Baltimore’s Hebrew Orphan Asylum

Baltimore Heritage is currently working in partnership with the Coppin Heights CDC and Coppin State University to preserve and plan the rehabilitation of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum building. Built in 1876, the Hebrew Orphan Asylum the oldest purpose-built Jewish orphanage in the nation. Learn more about this issue.

Restoring Clifton Mansion with CivicWorks

Clifton MansionBaltimore Heritage is working closely with the Friends of Clifton Mansion, Civic Works, the youth training program that occupies the Mansion, and the Henry Thompson of Clifton Society, to promote the historic importance of the Mansion and its role in Baltimore’s future. Learn more about this campaign.

Recent Updates

1232-1234 Druid Hill Avenue

Remembering the story of the Freedom House Why are we fighting to save Baltimore's Civil Rights heritage?

November 13, 2015

1234 Druid Hill Avenue had a story unlike any other. Harry S. Cummings, Baltimore’s first black City Councilman lived at the handsome rowhouse with his family from 1899 to 1911. In the 1950s and 1960s, the building served as offices to the local chapter of the NAACP, hosting Martin Luther King and Eleanor Roosevelt when … Read more

Grave marker, Christopher Family Graveyard

Christopher Family Graveyard is threatened by development What is in store for this all but forgotten family plot?

November 12, 2015

Special thanks to Lisa Kraus, volunteer with the Northeast Baltimore History Roundtable, for sharing this guest post on a new preservation issue in the Westfield neighborhood. Nestled in a tiny patch of woods at the heart of Northeast Baltimore’s Westfield neighborhood, the Christopher Family Graveyard has been all but forgotten over the last fifty years. … Read more

Photograph by Marti Pitrelli, October 31, 2015.

Freedom House demolition is a wake-up call for preservation in West Baltimore Join tomorrow's rally to save Civil Rights heritage at 1234 Druid Hill Avenue

November 11, 2015

Last week, Bethel AME Church demolished 1234 Druid Hill Avenue, a rowhouse located just outside Upton’s Marble Hill historic district with strong connections to Baltimore’s Civil Rights movement. The demolition came as a shock to neighborhood activists who had urged city officials to investigate and protect the property when Bethel AME began work on the … Read more

Confederate Monument, Mount Royal Terrace (c. 1906). Library of Congress

What do we do about Baltimore’s Confederate monuments? City commission begins review of public Confederate monuments this week

September 18, 2015

Yesterday, Baltimore Heritage attended the first of four meetings for the Mayor’s Special Commission to Review Baltimore’s Public Confederate Monuments. Over the next six months, this commission plans to consider four public monuments: Roger B. Taney Monument (1887) Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument (1903) Confederate Women’s Monument (1919) Lee-Jackson Monument (1948) Today’s meeting helped to define scope … Read more

Preservation Projects